God, King, and Subject: On the Development of Composite Political Cultures in the Western Himalaya, circa 1800-1900

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The history of British rule in the Indian Himalaya exemplifies the mutual enforcement of social identities and political cultures in modern South Asia. For the Khas ethnic majority of the Himachal Pradesh-Uttarakhand borderland, the colonial power's differentiation between "secular" and "religious" authorities engendered the division of substantially commensurable groups into "caste Hindu" and "tribal" societies. In demarcating borders along the "natural barrier" between the states, the British had severed a politically potent grassroots theocracy from its underlings, consolidated the fragmentation of the Shimla Hill States, and ultimately encouraged the development of a composite political cultures that complemented Khas traditions with Brahmanical creeds from the plains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)577-600
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Asian Studies
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 2019.

Keywords

  • Himachal Pradesh
  • Himalaya
  • Jubbal
  • Mahasu
  • Uttarakhand
  • Zomia
  • borderlands
  • caste
  • devta ka raj
  • state formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • History

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'God, King, and Subject: On the Development of Composite Political Cultures in the Western Himalaya, circa 1800-1900'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this