Genetic relationships and structured diversity of Lactuca georgica germplasm from Armenia and the Russian Federation among other members of Lactuca L., subsection Lactuca L., assessed by TRAP markers

Alex Beharav, Barbara Hellier, Kelley L. Richardson, Aleš Lebeda, Theodore Kisha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We studied the genetic relationships of Lactuca georgica samples originating in Armenia and the Russian Federation with samples representing four other predominantly self-pollinating wild Lactuca species (L. serriola, L. aculeata, L. saligna, and L. virosa) originating in various countries, as well as with samples representing cultivated lettuce, L. sativa by using 48 TRAP markers. We also visualized their genetic diversity and structure. The present study is likely the first molecular phylogenetic evaluation of a detailed screening of L. georgica germplasm. Data analysis of the three major wild species in this study, L. georgica (134 samples), L. virosa (57 samples), and L. serriola (40 samples) showed that allele frequencies of all 47 polymorphic loci varied significantly among the species. A total of 11, 9, and 10 alleles were unique to L. georgica, L. serriola, and L. virosa, respectively; 71% of TRAP marker diversity was between species. The Neighbor-Joining tree clearly clustered the whole set of 238 samples according to their taxonomic determination. It also reflects the gene diversity as well as the genetic distance values among samples representing the between and within variance of the various species. The L. georgica samples clustered most distantly from the L. sativa samples. The interspecies comparisons between samples belonging to L. georgica with those belonging to L. sativa displayed a high distance, lower only from the interspecies comparisons between samples belonging to L. virosa (in the tertiary gene pool of cultivated lettuce) with those belonging to L. sativa. Thus, additional molecular data with more hybridization experiments are necessary to reconsider if L. georgica is indeed a constituent of the primary gene pool of cultivated lettuce. The L. georgica samples were divided into two sub-clusters, with samples collected in southeast and central Armenia grouping together while all those collected in the north and Dagestan grouped together.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1963-1978
Number of pages16
JournalGenetic Resources and Crop Evolution
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements AB wishes to thank Dr. Alvina Avagian (National Coordinator for plant genetic resources, Armenia) for excellent organization of germplasm collections; Dr. Margarita Harutyunyan, Mrs. Marina Hovhannisyan, and Mrs. Ani Petrosyan [Laboratory of Plants Gene Pool and Breeding, Armenian National Agrarian University (ANAU), Yerevan, Armenia], and Dr. Gayane Melyan (Gene Bank of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, Scientific Center of Agrobiotechnology of ANAU, Echmiadzin, Armenia) for their great technical assistance during a collection trips in Armenia in 2011. BH wishes to thank Dr. George Fayvush (Institute of Botany, Yerevan, NAS of Armenia), Prof. M. Mosulishvili (Institute of Ecology, Tbilisi, Georgia), Dr. S. Litvinskaya (Kuban State University, Krasnodar, Russian Federation) and Dr. R. Murtazaliev, Mountain Botanical Garden, RAS Dagestan Scientific Center, Makhachkala, Dagestan) for seed collecting in 2009 and 2010. KLR wishes to thank Chris Richards (USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO) for his assistance with bootstrap analysis. AL wishes to thank the Internal Granting Agency of Palacky´ University in Olomouc, Czech Republic (IGA_Prf_2018-001), Project MSM 6198959215 (Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports, Czech Republic). A special thank to Dr. MateˇjLövy (Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Cˇ eské Budeˇjovice, Czech Republic) for his production of Fig. 1. This research was supported by USDA-ARS CRIS Project 5348-21000-026-00D and NIFA MultiState Project W006.

Funding Information:
AB wishes to thank Dr. Alvina Avagian (National Coordinator for plant genetic resources, Armenia) for excellent organization of germplasm collections; Dr. Margarita Harutyunyan, Mrs. Marina Hovhannisyan, and Mrs. Ani Petrosyan [Laboratory of Plants Gene Pool and Breeding, Armenian National Agrarian University (ANAU), Yerevan, Armenia], and Dr. Gayane Melyan (Gene Bank?of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, Scientific Center of Agrobiotechnology of ANAU, Echmiadzin, Armenia) for their great technical assistance during a collection trips in Armenia in 2011. BH wishes to thank Dr. George Fayvush (Institute of Botany, Yerevan, NAS of Armenia), Prof. M. Mosulishvili?(Institute of Ecology, Tbilisi, Georgia), Dr. S. Litvinskaya (Kuban State University, Krasnodar, Russian Federation) and Dr. R. Murtazaliev, Mountain Botanical Garden, RAS Dagestan Scientific Center, Makhachkala, Dagestan) for seed collecting in 2009 and 2010. KLR wishes to thank Chris Richards (USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO) for his assistance with bootstrap analysis. AL wishes to thank the Internal Granting Agency of Palack? University in Olomouc, Czech Republic (IGA_Prf_2018-001), Project MSM 6198959215 (Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports, Czech Republic). A special thank to Dr. Mat?j L?vy (Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, ?esk? Bud?jovice, Czech Republic) for his production of Fig.?1. This research was supported by USDA-ARS CRIS Project 5348-21000-026-00D and NIFA MultiState Project W006. All the authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Springer Nature B.V.

Keywords

  • Gene pools
  • Genetic variation
  • Lactuca saligna
  • Lactuca sativa
  • Lactuca serriola
  • Lactuca virosa
  • Wild lettuce

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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