Genetic diversity revealed by single nucleotide polymorphism markers in a worldwide germplasm collection of durum wheat

Jing Ren, Daokun Sun, Liang Chen, Frank M. You, Jirui Wang, Yunliang Peng, Eviatar Nevo, Dongfa Sun, Ming Cheng Luo, Junhua Peng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid wheat. Genetic structure was greatly impacted by multiple factors, such as environmental conditions, breeding methods reflected by release periods of varieties, and gene flows via human activities. A loss of genetic diversity was observed from landraces and old cultivars to the modern cultivars released during periods of the Early Green Revolution, but an increase in cultivars released during the Post Green Revolution. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity among the 10 mega ecogeographical regions indicated that South America, North America, and Europe possessed the richest genetic variability, while the Middle East showed moderate levels of genetic diversity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7061-7088
Number of pages28
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Cultivars
  • Genetic structure
  • Landrace
  • Molecular marker
  • SNP
  • T.durum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Catalysis
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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