Genera and species vs. laws of nature two epistemic frameworks and their respective ideal worlds

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper seeks to exhibit and explain, by way of comparison, two ideal kinds of knowledge: knowledge based on classifications according to genera and species, as in Aristotelianism and common sense, and scientific knowledge based on the application of laws of nature. I will proceed by attempting (1) to determine the role that presuppositions play in knowledge in general by means of the distinction between content and form; (2) to describe and explain the main features of both ideal forms of knowledge; and, finally, (3) to analyze the relation between these two forms of knowledge as it is presented in Eddington's celebrated discussion of the “two tables”. I will be critical of the widespread view that modern science is the correct form of knowledge, and that common sense is merely an illusion.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)6-15
    Number of pages10
    JournalStudies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A
    Volume81
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2020

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

    Keywords

    • Aristotelian science
    • Common sense
    • Function
    • Modern science
    • Substance

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • History and Philosophy of Science

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