Gender Differences in the Motivations for the Use of Sanctions in Conflicts Within Muslim and Jewish Couples

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Abstract

This study aimed to examine differences between men and women and between Muslims, secular Jews, and religious Jews in their motivations for using sanctions within their intimate relationships. This work involved heterosexual couples from the general population. The sample included 95 Muslim, 68 secular Jewish, and 70 ultra-orthodox Jewish couples (466 participants). The findings of the study show that sanction use during times of conflict is prevalent among the vast majority of couples. Motivations for the use of sanctions are stronger among women than men. In addition, the strongest motivation expressed by both genders was a motivation for conflict resolution. This is the first time that sanctions, as a tactic to cope with conflict, have been addressed in a scholarly manner. This study provides a preliminary estimate of how commonly these types of behaviors are used in intimate relationships. Theoretical and empirical implications of the theoretical framework and the findings are discussed, including the role of the use of sanction in the escalation of intimate partner conflicts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2581-2597
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume37
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2020.

Keywords

  • gender
  • intimate partner conflict
  • motivation
  • religion
  • sanction
  • subtle aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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