Gender differences in lay persons' beliefs and knowledge about Alzheimer's disease (AD): A national representative study of Israeli adults

Perla Werner, Shira Goldberg, Silvia Mandel, Amos D. Korczyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although few, studies within the context of AD show that levels of worry and concern about AD are relatively low in lay persons. Since clear gender differences have been reported in the incidence and prevalence of dementia, as well as in its consequences, gender could be hypothesized as one of the factors influencing worry and concern about developing AD. The aim of the present study was to assess gender differences in public's beliefs about AD, and to examine whether men and women differ in their worries and concerns about developing the disease, as well as in their knowledge about it. A phone survey was conducted with a representative sample of 632 lay persons (mean age = 45) in Israel. Information regarding males' and females' perceptions about their susceptibility, worry, fear and knowledge about AD was assessed. Males and females showed no statistically significant differences in their awareness of AD. Female participants consistently reported higher levels of perceived susceptibility, worry, fear, and knowledge about AD than male participants. Our findings highlight the need to improve the knowledge and awareness of the general public about AD, and particularly among men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)400-404
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • AD
  • Beliefs
  • Gender
  • Knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Aging

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