Fundamentally unacceptable yet occasionally unavoidable: China's options on external interference in the Middle East

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

China's 'non-interference' policy is not a new phenomenon. It originates in pre-modern Chinese history when the Empire had been isolated from the rest of the world, as well as in the Mao era when the Chinese-even if they had the will to interfere-did not have the capabilities. Post-Mao and post-Cold War, China has the capabilities but not yet the will to become more involved. Still, economic prosperity and growing political prominence have forced Beijing to compromise. Fundamentally, China's first option remains 'non-interference' and settling of conflicts by the parties concerned. Yet if this fails, then the Chinese prefer an intervention by a regional or professional organisation. If this attempt too, fails, then, reluctantly, Beijing turns to the United Nations Security Council as an option. The worst option is external and independent intervention. All these options are evident in China's Middle East policy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-41
Number of pages17
JournalChina Report
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • African Union
  • Arab League
  • Darfur
  • Gulf War
  • intervention
  • Iran-Iraq War
  • Libya
  • peacekeeping
  • Sudan
  • Syria
  • UN Security Council

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fundamentally unacceptable yet occasionally unavoidable: China's options on external interference in the Middle East'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this