Four-year follow-up of the immune status of young adults given a single booster dose of trivalent oral poliovaccine

Manfred S. Green, Rachel Handsher, Raphael Slepon, Shai Ashkenazi, Ella Mendelson, Dani Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 1988 an outbreak of type 1 paralytic poliomyelitis occurred in Israel. Almost the entire population in the age group 0-40 years received a single dose of trivalent oral polio vaccine. We examined the serological responses to the vaccine at 2 weeks and 4 years later, in a group of 17 vaccinees. Geometric mean antibody titres (GMTs) against both the type 1 epidemic and Mahoney strains had declined by about 50% from the levels found at 2 weeks after vaccination. However, they were still more than five times higher than the prevaccination levels. All vaccinees had neutralizing antibody titres against both the type 1 strains of at least 1:64, well above the 1:8 titre regarded as protective. The GMTs against the type 2 and 3 strains declined to about one-third of the 2-week postvaccination levels but were also well above protective levels. These findings indicate that antibody titres against both the Mahoney and epidemic type 1 strains remained at very adequate levels over a period of at least 4 years. Thus the immunity resulting from a single booster dose of oral poliovaccine in young adults is likely to be long-lasting, a finding of particular importance for travellers on extended visits to endemic areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)582-584
Number of pages3
JournalVaccine
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • antibodies
  • immunity
  • poliomyelitis
  • Poliovaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology (all)
  • Veterinary (all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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