Food deprivation modulates γ-aminobutyric acid receptors and peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in rats

Abraham Weizman, Miri Bidder, Fuad Fares, Moshe Gavish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effect of 5 days of food deprivation followed by 5 days of refeeding on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, central benzodiazepine receptors (CBR), and peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites (PBzS) was studied in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Starvation induced a decrease in the density of PBzS in peripheral organs: adrenal (35%; P < 0.001), kidney (33%; P < 0.01), and heart (34%; P < 0.001). Restoration of [3H]PK 11195 binding to normal values was observed in all three organs after 5 days of refeeding. The density of PBzS in the ovary, pituitary, and hypothalamus was not affected by starvation. Food deprivation resulted in a 35% decrease in cerebellar GABA receptors (P < 0.01), while CBR in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex remained unaltered. The changes in PBzS observed in the heart and kidney may be related to the long-term metabolic stress associated with starvation and to the functional changes occurring in these organs. The down-regulation of the adrenal PBzS is attributable to the suppressive effect of hypercortisolemia on pituitary ACTH release. The reduction in cerebellar GABA receptors may be an adaptive response to food deprivation stress and may be relevant to the proaggressive effect of hunger.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-100
Number of pages5
JournalBrain Research
Volume535
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Dec 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Central benzodiazepine receptor
  • Peripheral benzodiazepine binding site
  • Starvation
  • γ-Aminobutyric acid receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Molecular Biology
  • General Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology

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