Female detection of the synthetic sex pheromone contributes to the efficacy of mating disruption of the European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana

Ally R. Harari, Tirtza Zahavi, Hadass Steinitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Studies of the mechanisms by which mating-disruption techniques control insect pest populations have traditionally focused on the effects of the species-specific sex pheromone on the male moths, while neglecting possible direct effects of the pheromone on females. Here, the effects of exposure to synthetic species-specific sex-pheromone on Lobesia botrana (European grapevine moth) females were tested. Results: Females in vineyards that were treated with mating-disruption pheromone burst into short bouts of flying more frequently, but called significantly less frequently than females in untreated plots. Reduced calling caused by exposure to the species-specific sex-pheromone may increase the age at which females mate and thereby reduce female fecundity. Females that called in a pheromone-saturated environment experienced a decrease in number of oviposited eggs. A further decrease in reproductive success may occur if females delay oviposition when exposed to access of the synthetic pheromone. Conclusions: In addition to reducing the ability of males to locate females, the mating-disruption technique can suppress pest numbers as a consequence of its direct effects on females. The two mechanisms probably act synergistically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-322
Number of pages7
JournalPest Management Science
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

Keywords

  • Calling
  • Females
  • Fitness
  • Mating disruption
  • Oviposition
  • Pheromone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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