Feedback Seeking in Children and Adolescents: Associations with Self-Perceptions, Attachment Representations, and Depression

Jude Cassidy, Yair Ziv, Tara G. Mehta, Brooke C. Feeney

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Because the feedback children and adolescents receive is important to their development, 2 experimental studies were designed to examine children's (M = 12 years) and adolescents' (M = 17 years) active selection of the quality of feedback they wish to receive. In both studies evidence emerged that participants' self-perceptions influence their feedback seeking. Participants with positive self-perceptions sought more positive feedback than participants with negative self-perceptions and sought more positive feedback than expected by chance. Participants with negative self-perceptions lacked this tendency to seek positive feedback and sometimes sought less positive feedback than expected by chance. As expected, depression and attachment-related measures were also associated with participants' feedback seeking. Contributions of feedback-seeking patterns to stability and change in children's and adolescents' development are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-628
Number of pages17
JournalChild Development
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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