Exploring Social Justice in Mixed/Divided Cities: From Local to Global Learning

Corey Shdaimah, Jane Lipscomb, Roni Strier, Dassi Postan-Aizik, Susan Leviton, Jody Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background University of Haifa and the University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty developed a parallel binational, interprofessional American-Israeli course which explores social justice in the context of increasing urban, local, and global inequities. Objectives This article describes the course's innovative approach to critically examine how social justice is framed in mixed/divided cities from different professional perspectives (social work, health, law). Participatory methods such as photo-voice, experiential learning, and theatre of the oppressed provide students with a shared language and multiple media to express and problematize their own and others' understanding of social (in)justice and to imagine social change. Findings Much learning about “self” takes place in an immersion experience with “others.” Crucial conversations about “the other” and social justice can occur more easily within the intercultural context. In these conversations, students and faculty experience culture as diverse, complex, and personal. Conclusions Students and faculty alike found the course personally and professionally transformative. Examination of social justice in Haifa and Baltimore strengthened our appreciation for the importance of context and the value of global learning to provide insights on local challenges and opportunities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)964-971
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Global Health
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Keywords

  • divided cities
  • global learning
  • interprofessional education
  • mixed cities
  • social justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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