Explaining the Factors Shaping the Likelihood of Poverty Among Working Families by Using a Concurrent Mixed Method Design

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Working poverty is becoming an increasingly common phenomenon. Prior quantitative research has painted a representative but narrow picture of the contours of in-work poverty, while ethnographic case studies have provided a nuanced account of the mechanisms shaping the experiences of workers in specific low-wage labor markets. However, none of these studies provides an account that, at the same time, covers the main theories explaining working poverty, is based on a representative population sample, and is attuned to the proximate interactional dynamics shaping poverty risks. The current study employs a concurrent mixed-methods design combining information from repeated cross-sectional nationally representative surveys with in-depth interviews, and argues that this design is ideal for explaining the factors shaping the likelihood of in-work poverty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1089-1109
Number of pages21
JournalSocial Indicators Research
Volume157
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research presented in this paper was supported by funding received from the German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development (Grant # G-1221–374.4).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V.

Keywords

  • Concurrent mixed methods
  • In-work poverty
  • Israel
  • Poverty
  • Working poor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (all)

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