Effects of Message Framing and Narrative Format on Promoting Persuasive Conversations with Others About the Flu Vaccine

Nehama Lewis, Erga Atad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the effects of message framing (loss vs. gain) and format (narrative vs. expository) on intentions to discuss flu vaccination with a close social referent. We test the effects of video messages using a two-wave web-based randomized experiment among adults in Israel (baseline: N = 429, one-month follow-up: N = 241). Exposure to narrative messages was positively associated with intentions to discuss flu vaccination. Exposure to loss-framed messages was positively associated with increased likelihood of discussing vaccination with the referent at follow-up. Effects of message framing and format were moderated by concern for the referent’s health. Findings support the use of persuasive messages to motivate interpersonal conversation to promote vaccination. Results contribute to theory on risk-framing by showing that audiences may evaluate loss-framed messages according to their risk perceptions, when greater concern for health risks motivate action, not only for one’s own health but for another person’s health.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Communication
Early online date21 Sep 2023
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 21 Sep 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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