Effects of childhood experience of violence between parents and/or parent-to-child violence on young israeli adults' global self-esteem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study examines long-term effects of family violence in childhood (violence between parents and/or parent-to-child violence) on adult self-esteem. Data were derived from a sample of 352 university students. Findings show that young adults not exposed to family violence in childhood report the highest self-esteem; lower self-esteem reports were by those experiencing one type of family violence; the lowest self-esteem was reported by those who experienced two types of family violence. In the latter two groups, self-esteem was also affected by frequency of violence. A linkage was identified between the family violence types examined: The more frequent one type of violence, the more frequent the other type. Theoretical and practical implications for the study of effects of family violence on child development are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)699-713
Number of pages15
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Springer Publishing Company.

Keywords

  • Child exposure to family violence
  • Co-occurrence family violence
  • Corporal punishment
  • Interparental physical violence
  • Parent-to-child physical violence
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Law
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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