Earliest evidence of toxocara sp. in a 1.2-million-yr-old extinct hyena (Pachycrocuta brevirostris) coprolite from northwest Pakistan

Angela R. Perri, Susann Heinrich, Shira Gur-Arieh, Jeffrey J. Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study of fossil parasites can provide insight into the antiquity of host-parasite relationships and the origins and evolution of these paleoparasites. Here, a coprolite (fossilized feces) from the 1.2-million-yr-old paleontological site of Haro River Quarry in northwestern Pakistan was analyzed for paleoparasites. Micromorphological thin sectioning and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) analysis confirms the coprolite belonged to a bone-eating carnivore, likely the extinct giant short-faced hyena (Pachycrocuta brevirostris). Parasitological analysis shows the coprolite to be positive for Toxocara sp. To our knowledge, this is the earliest evidence for Toxocara sp. found.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-141
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© American Society of Parasitologists 2017.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Parasitology

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