Do training programs promote identification and treatment in cases of elder abuse in Long Term Care (LTC) facilities?

Sara Alon, Barbara Lang, Tova Band-Winterstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To examine the impact of training on detection and reporting cases of elder abuse and neglect perpetrated by staff in LTC facilities and to compare staff with previous training to those with no training. A quantitative study in which questionnaires were collected from 250 multi- professional participants at a training seminar. Trainees with previous training on elder abuse reported higher perceived self-efficacy, higher intention to take action asking residents direct questions on abuse, to refer and report cases of elder abuse. They identified more cases of elder abuse in comparison to trainees without previous training. Findings indicate a positive relationship between perceived self-efficacy and intention to take action, and between perceived self-efficacy and direct questioning and referral for further inquiry. Training professionals is essential in coping effectively with elder abuse and neglect in LTC facilities.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEducational Gerontology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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