Do Self-Figure Drawings Reveal the Drawer’s Cultural Values? Thais and Israelis Draw Themselves

Bussakorn Binson, Dita Judith Federman, Rachel Lev-Wiesel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate to what extent the self-figure drawings of young adult Thais differ from the self-figure drawings of a matched Israeli group. The convenience sample consisted of 24 participants; 12 Israelis and 12 Thais were asked to draw themselves with a pencil on a sheet of A4 paper and add a narrative to the drawing. In addition, they were asked to draw how they are perceived by the other group. Analyses of variance were conducted within and between the groups of drawings. The results indicated significant differences in body size, body shape, and the addition of cultural symbols between the two groups. The differences in cultural values were discussed in light of the findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-343
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Humanistic Psychology
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019.

Keywords

  • Israel
  • Thailand
  • eco-cultural perspective
  • self-figure drawing
  • symbolic representations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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