Dis/working with diagrams how genealogies and maps obscure nanoscale worlds (A hunter-gatherer case)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Standard diagrammatic tools in ethnographies, locational maps, and kinship trees are supposed to help make fieldwork and its findings intelligible to readers. This article explores how, to the contrary, they obscure locals’ lived worlds and the fieldwork process when they are used cross-culturally and cross-scalarly in studies of minuscule indigenous societies, anthropology’s traditional study subject. I draw on my experience of producing and using these visuals, from fieldwork through to writing ethnography, in my work with foragers who live in South India in order to show the effect of these diagrammatic tools on our understanding of nanoscale communities and their intimate worlds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-62
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Analysis
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Berghahn Books.

Keywords

  • Foragers
  • Intimate communities
  • Kinship diagrams
  • Maps
  • Scalar turn
  • South India

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (all)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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