Direction of influence between posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure therapy among children and adolescents

Idan M. Aderka, Edna B. Foa, Edna Applebaum, Naama Shafran, Eva Gilboa-Schechtman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Our objective in the present study was to examine the temporal sequencing of posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and adolescents. Method: Participants were 73 children and adolescents (56.2 female) between the ages of 8 and 18. Participants completed self-report measures of posttraumatic stress and depression prior to every session. Measures included the Child PTSD Symptom Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Children's Depression Inventory. Results: Multilevel mediational analyses indicated reciprocal relations during treatment: Changes in posttraumatic symptoms led to changes in depressive symptoms and vice versa. Posttraumatic symptoms accounted for 64.1 of the changes in depression, whereas depressive symptoms accounted for 11.0 of the changes in posttraumatic stress. Conclusions: Prolonged exposure therapy may work primarily by reducing posttraumatic stress, which in turn reduces depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-425
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • children
  • depression
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • prolonged exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Direction of influence between posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure therapy among children and adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this