Differentiation of self as a theoretical framework to understand comorbidity of sexual dysfunction and eating disorder symptoms: an exploratory study

Ateret Gewirtz-Meydan, Zohar Spivak-Lavi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although the empirical evidence supporting the comorbidity of sexual dysfunction and eating disorders is growing, the theoretical common ground of this comorbidity is not yet known. The aim of the current study was to examine the differentiation of self as a theoretical common ground of the comorbidity between sexual dysfunction and eating disorder symptoms (EDS). We used profiles of sexual dysfunction and eating disorders to examine how these profiles differed in terms of differentiation of self. The study was conducted as an online survey among a convenience sample of 985 Israeli women. Women in the comorbidity group (high levels of both sexual dysfunction and EDS) had significantly lower levels of differentiation of self than did women in the other groups: no disorder (low levels of sexual dysfunction and EDS), EDS (low levels of sexual dysfunction and high levels of EDS), and sexual dysfunction (high levels of sexual dysfunction and low levels of EDS). The current study suggests that differentiation of self may be a shared feature among both sexual dysfunction and EDS. Limitations of the study, directions for future research, and clinical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSexual and Relationship Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • differentiation of self
  • eating disorders
  • latent profile analysis
  • Sexual dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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