Differential effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist on social discrimination and contextual fear in amygdala and hippocampus

Amir Segev, Irit Akirav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 mg/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval. In the ventral subiculum (vSub), WIN impaired fear retrieval. In the neutral social discrimination task, WIN into the vSub impaired both acquisition/consolidation and retrieval, whereas in the medial amygdala WIN impaired acquisition. The results suggest that cannabinoid signaling differentially affects memory in a task-, region-, and memory stage-dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-259
Number of pages6
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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