COVID-19 Vaccinations and Anxiety in Middle-Aged and Older Jews and Arabs in Israel: The Moderating Roles of Ethnicity and Subjective Age

Yoav S. Bergman, Yuval Palgi, Boaz Ben-David, Ehud Bodner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Subjective age (i.e., feeling younger/older than one’s chronological age) plays a significant role in older minority group members’ psychological well-being. In light of the importance of vaccinations for fighting COVID-19, it is unclear whether ethnicity and subjective age moderate the connection between receiving COVID-19 vaccinations and anxiety in Israel. Jewish (n = 198) and Arab older adults (n = 84) provided information regarding COVID-19 vaccinations, subjective age, and anxiety symptoms, as well as additional socio-demographic and COVID-19-related health factors (age range= 40–100, M = 62.5, SD = 12.34). Results demonstrated that feeling older was associated with increased anxiety (p <.001) and that vaccinations were linked to increased anxiety among Jews (p <.05). Moreover, the association between COVID-19 vaccinations and anxiety was significant only among Jewish participants with an older subjective age (p <.05). We stress the importance of examining cultural diversities regarding the contribution of subjective age in the context of COVID-19 and psychological well-being.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022.

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • COVID-19 vaccines
  • cultural differences
  • subjective aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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