Correction to: Who benefits most from expectancy effects? A combined neuroimaging and antidepressant trial in depressed older adults (Translational Psychiatry, (2021), 11, 1, (475), 10.1038/s41398-021-01606-1)

Sigal Zilcha-Mano, Meredith L. Wallace, Patrick J. Brown, Joel Sneed, Steven P. Roose, Bret R. Rutherford

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Debate

Abstract

The original version of this article unfortunately contained an error in the references. Reference 12 should read as follows: Rutherford BR, Choi CJ, Choi J, Maas B, He X, O’Boyle K, et al. Slowed processing speed disrupts patient expectancy in late life depression. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2021;29:619–30. The original article has been corrected.

Original languageEnglish
Article number430
JournalTranslational Psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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