Civilian Military Security Coordinators Coping with Frequent Traumatic Events: Spirituality, Community Resilience, and Emotional Distress

Michael Weinberg, Adi Kimchy Elimellech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Civilian military security coordinators are a unique kind of first responders. They live in communities that are close to the border and are responsible for the security of their community in routine and emergency situations until the arrival of the army or the police. Their role puts them at an elevated risk of experiencing emotional distress and developing PTSD. The present study, which was conducted in Israel following terror incidents over the year 2018, aimed to examine the relationships between spirituality and perceived community resilience, on the one hand, and PTSD symptoms and stress, on the other, among civilian military security coordinators. One hundred and thirteen (n = 113) civilian military security coordinators living up to 12.4 miles from the border who are routinely exposed to terror and other traumatic events completed demographic, spirituality, community resilience, PTSD, and stress questionnaires. Structural-equation-model analyses showed that spirituality was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms and stress. However, perceived community resilience was not associated with PTSD symptoms or stress. In addition, age was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms and stress. Financial situation was also negatively associated with PTSD symptoms and stress and incidence of exposure to terror and security threats was associated only with PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8826
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors.

Keywords

  • PTSD
  • civilian security coordinators
  • community resilience
  • spirituality
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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