Bus commuters' coping strategies and anxiety from terrorism: An example of the Israeli experience

Yori Gidron, Reuven Gal, Sa'ar Zahavi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the use of three coping strategies: (1) emotion- focused coping (calming-distraction); (2) problem-focused coping (checking- behavior); and (3) denial (reduced perceived vulnerability), and their relationship to anxiety from terrorism among 50 Israeli bus commuters. Their mean age was 31 years (60% females). Commuting frequency was negatively correlated, and problem-focused coping was positively correlated with anxiety from terrorism. Ratios of problem-focused coping/denial and of problem- focused/emotion-focused coping were each positively correlated with anxiety from terrorism. Coping ratios accounted for 15% of the variance in anxiety from terrorism, after considering commuting frequency. Combining minimal problem-focused preventative acts with distraction and reduced perceived vulnerability may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Commuters
  • Coping strategies
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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