Bullying among special education students with intellectual disabilities: Differences in social adjustment and social skills

Shunit Reiter, Noam Lapidot-Lefler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Harassment and bullying among 186 students with intellectual disabilities, ages 12 to 21 years, in special education schools were examined. The differences between bullies and victims in terms of social adjustment and social skills were investigated. No prototypes characterizing differences in social skills were found between the three subgroups: victim, bully, and victim-bully. However, bullies and victim-bullies exhibited significantly higher levels of challenging behaviors, such as temper tantrums, unruly and quarrelsome behavior, and a tendency to lie and steal. Significant correlations were also found among actions as a bully, violent behavior, and hyperactivity. Being a victim was correlated with emotional and interpersonal problems.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)174-181
    Number of pages8
    JournalIntellectual and Developmental Disabilities
    Volume45
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2007

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Education
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Community and Home Care
    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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