Bioavailability of calcium in an enriched postbiotic system compared to calcium citrate in healthy postmenopausal females; A randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled, crossover study

Marina Friling, Adi Haber, Sharon Furman-Assaf, David Israel, Gil Harari, Malkanthi Evans, David C. Crowley, Arthur C. Ouwehand, Eran Ivanir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Bioavailability of calcium is an important consideration when designing supplements for achieving adequate calcium intake, mainly in high-risk, and aged populations. Alternative supplementation strategies may be able to circumvent absorption issues commonly seen with calcium supplements. The objective of this study was to assess the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium formulations vs. comparator product in healthy postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 24 participants between 45 and 65 years were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, three-phase, crossover study, with a 7-day washout period between phases. The bioavailability of calcium from calcium-carrying Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ca-SC) or calcium-carrying Lactobacillus (Ca-LAB) in the form of postbiotic products versus calcium citrate, a conventional salt-based calcium supplement, was determined. Each product provided 630 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D3. After a 14-h (overnight) fast followed by a single dose of product with a standard low-calcium breakfast, both serum and urine calcium concentrations were assessed for up to 8 and 24 h, respectively. Results: Ca-LAB resulted in greater calcium bioavailability, demonstrated by significantly higher area under the curve and peak concentration both in blood and urine, and total calcium mass excreted in urine. The bioavailability of calcium was similar for Ca-SC and calcium citrate except for the peak concentration value that was significantly higher for calcium citrate. Both Ca-LAB and Ca-SC were well tolerated with no significant difference in adverse events between the products during the study. Discussion: These findings suggest that calcium enriched in a Lactobacillus-based postbiotic system is associated with higher levels of bioavailability as compared to calcium citrate, while a calcium-enriched yeast-based postbiotic does not influence calcium absorption.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1073622
JournalFrontiers in Nutrition
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 Friling, Haber, Furman-Assaf, Israel, Harari, Evans, Crowley, Ouwehand and Ivanir.

Keywords

  • absorption
  • bioavailability
  • calcium citrate
  • calcium supplements
  • Lactobacillus
  • post menopause
  • postbiotics
  • yeast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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