Balancing the family and the collective in raising children: Why communal sleeping in kibbutzim was predestined to end

Ora Aviezer, Abraham Sagi, Marinus Van Ijzendoorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article integrates research data about attachment in kibbutz-raised children with a review of the socio-historical processes that shaped the interrelations between the kibbutz family and the collective and influenced childrearing practices. It uses systems theory to evaluate the changing practices of kibbutz childrearing with particular focus on communal sleeping for infants and children away from their parents, and its impact on the formation of attachment relations to parents and caregivers, transmission of attachment across generations, and later school competence. It argues that artificial childrearing practices such as communal sleeping for infants and children created a unique and unprecedented "social experiment in nature," which, from the perspective of attachment theory, was predestined to be discontinued because it betrayed the essential attachment needs of most parents and children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-454
Number of pages20
JournalFamily Process
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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