Associations among loneliness, internal locus of control and subjective accelerated ageing in older adults who received the booster vaccination

Lee Greenblatt-Kimron, Yuval Palgi, Tali Regev, Boaz M. Ben-David

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background A rise in loneliness among older adults since the COVID-19 outbreak, even after vaccination, has been highlighted. Loneliness has deleterious consequences, with specific effects on perceptions of the ageing process during the COVID-19 pandemic. Coping with stressful life events and the challenges of ageing may result in a perception of acceleration of this process. Aim Studies have shown a buffering effect of an internal locus of control in the relationship between COVID-19 stress and mental distress. The current study examined whether loneliness predicts subjective accelerated ageing and whether internal locus of control moderates this relationship. Method Two waves of community-dwelling older adults (M = 70.44, s.d. = 5.95; age range 61–88 years), vaccinated three times, were sampled by a web-survey company. Participants completed the questionnaire after the beginning of the third vaccination campaign and reported again 4 months later on loneliness, internal locus of control and subjective accelerated ageing level in the second wave. Results Participants with higher levels of loneliness presented 4 months later with higher subjective accelerated ageing. Participants with a low level of internal locus of control presented 4 months later with high subjective accelerated ageing, regardless of their loneliness level. Participants with a high level of internal locus of control and a low level of loneliness presented with the lowest subjective accelerated ageing 4 months later. Conclusions The findings emphasise the deleterious effects of loneliness and low internal locus of control on older adults’ perception of their ageing process. Practitioners should focus their interventions not only on loneliness but also on improving the sense of internal locus of control to improve subjective accelerated ageing.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere54
JournalBJPsych Open
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Keywords

  • internal locus of control
  • Loneliness
  • older adults
  • subjective accelerated ageing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations among loneliness, internal locus of control and subjective accelerated ageing in older adults who received the booster vaccination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this