Aspects of Shared Decision Making in a Cognitive-Educational Intervention for Family Members of Persons Coping With Severe Mental Illness

Penina Weiss, Dorit Redlich-Amirav, Sara Daass-Iraqi, Noami Hadas-Lidor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Partnerships and family inclusion are embedded in mental health policies. Shared Decision Making (SDM) is as an effective health communication model designed to facilitate service users and providers engagement in reaching jointly decisions concerning interventions. Keshet is a 15 bi-weekly academic course for family members of people with mental illnesses that enhances positive family cognitive communication skills. Purpose: To exhibit how SDM is inherently expressed in Keshet. Method: We conducted a secondary analysis of previous Keshet evaluation studies and course protocols that focused on revealing SDM use. Results: SDM was found to be a prominent feature in Keshet interventions in both the structure of the course as well as the process and procedures. Following participation in the program, making decisions jointly was found to be a prominent feature. Conclusions: Interventions such as Keshet that include an SDM approach can contribute to the integration of academic, professional and “lived experience” within a shared perspective, thus promoting an enhanced equality- based SDM model that benefits individuals as well as mental health systems.

Original languageEnglish
Article number681118
JournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Copyright © 2021 Weiss, Redlich-Amirav, Daass-Iraqi and Hadas-Lidor.

Keywords

  • dynamic cognitive intervention
  • family caregivers
  • Keshet
  • mental health
  • shared decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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