Applying intersectionality theory to understand female Arab art-therapists’ experiences with child maltreatment mandatory reporting

Ravit Alfandari, Zakiah Massarwa, Guy Enosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study moved away from the usual empirical and moral discussion about all-encompassing child maltreatment mandatory reporting outcomes toward a much more detailed and nuanced investigation of its implementation in a minority group. We focused on female Arab art-therapists in Israel working in their community. Twelve female Arab art-therapists participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using grounded theory. Participants’ extreme vulnerability was an emergent quality of analysis and facilitated intersectional framing to account for the findings. The convergence of gender, ethno-culture and occupational status constituted unique obstacles to reporting. Participants described an array of systemic barriers to reporting, some of which could jeopardise their safety and that of their family and job. They raised doubts about the benefits of reporting outweighing the harm. Creating a climate in which reporting is possible and acceptable is the responsibility of the society, rather than that of individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1747-1755
Number of pages9
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The first and second authors contributed equally to the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • Arab community
  • art-therapists
  • child maltreatment
  • intersectionality
  • mandatory reporting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Applying intersectionality theory to understand female Arab art-therapists’ experiences with child maltreatment mandatory reporting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this