A Network Analysis of Peritraumatic Distress Reactions and Their Relation to Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in People Exposed to Community Fires

Talya Greene, Yuval Palgi, Sheila Daniela Dicker-Oren, Ohad Gilbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Research indicates that people who experience more intense peritraumatic reactions are at higher risk of subsequently developing PTSD. The study used network analysis to: 1) explore the network structure of peritraumatic distress reactions; 2) identify clusters of peritraumatic distress reactions; and 3) assess whether central items in the peritraumatic network have stronger network associations with subsequent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS). Method: A convenience sample of adults living in communities affected by large-scale community fires in Israel (November 2016) were recruited. Participants completed the 13-item peritraumatic distress inventory (PDI) within one month of the fires (n = 372), and the PTSD checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) four months after the fires (n = 199). Network analyses and exploratory graph analysis were conducted. Results: The PDI items were positively connected to each other in a network structure, which divided into two clusters: emotional reactions; and physical/somatic reactions along with guilt and shame. Loss of emotional control was the most central peritraumatic distress symptom. Highly central peritraumatic distress symptoms were not strongly associated with subsequent PTS; rather, physical reactions were most associated with PTS levels four months after the fires. Conclusions: Future studies should investigate targeting peritraumatic physical reactions as an early secondary prevention strategy for PTSD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-389
Number of pages15
JournalPsychiatry (New York)
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Washington School of Psychiatry.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Network Analysis of Peritraumatic Distress Reactions and Their Relation to Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in People Exposed to Community Fires'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this